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Kant’s legacy in western institution

By Beatrice Carducci

Immanuel Kant is widely considered to be one of the most influential philosophers of the modern era, and his ideas have had a profound impact on the development of liberalism as a political and social philosophy. In this essay, I will examine the key principles of Kant's philosophy and how they relate to the liberal tradition, including his concept of autonomy, his moral theory, and his ideas about the state and society.


Kant's philosophy is rooted in the idea of autonomy, or self-rule. He believed that individuals have the ability to govern themselves and make their own decisions, and that this autonomy should be respected and protected by society. This principle is central to the liberal tradition, which emphasizes the importance of individual freedom and the protection of individual rights.


In his work "Perpetual Peace: a Philosophical Sketch" Kant lays out a proposal for a lasting peace between nations, based on his belief that war and conflict are not inevitable, but rather the result of flawed political institutions. Kant suggests that in order for peace to be achieved and maintained, certain conditions must be met, such as the abolition of standing armies, and the establishment of a "cosmopolitan right" that would guarantee the rights of individuals and nations. He also calls for the establishment of an international court to settle disputes between nations, and for the use of diplomacy rather than military force to resolve conflicts. A lasting peace would be obtained through a federation of free states governed by the principles of republicanism, and the key to obtain this federation was through the establishment of a “League of Nations” in which states would come together to resolve conflicts peacefully. This idea of a federation of free states is a fundamental aspect of liberalism, as it emphasizes the importance of international cooperation and the peaceful resolution of conflicts.


In "Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals," Kant emphasized the importance of moral autonomy and the "categorical imperative", one of his key contributions to liberalism. This principle states that individuals must always act in a way that they can do it in every situation, as a universal law. In other words, one should only take actions that they would be willing to see everyone else take as well. This principle forms the basis for Kant's moral and political philosophy, as it emphasizes the importance of treating others with respect and fairness. This emphasis on moral autonomy and the importance of respecting the autonomy of others is a central aspect of liberalism, as it values the individual and their freedom to make their own choices.


In terms of the state and society, Kant believed that individuals should be free to govern themselves, and that the role of the state should be limited to ensuring the protection of individual rights and the common good. He argued that the state should not interfere in the affairs of individuals, and that individuals should be free to pursue their own goals and interests. This idea is central to the liberal tradition, which emphasizes the importance of limited government and individual freedom.


Kant's ideas about autonomy, morality, and the state have had a significant influence on the liberal tradition, and his philosophy continues to be a major source of inspiration for political and social thinkers today. However, it is important to note that there are also criticisms of Kant and his ideas, particularly in terms of his views on race, gender, and colonialism.


In conclusion, Immanuel Kant's philosophy is closely linked to the liberal tradition, and his ideas about autonomy, morality, and the state have had a significant impact on the development of liberal thought. However, it is important to consider the criticisms of his work and how they relate to contemporary liberal politics.


To name a couple exemple, the United States is a nation that has been heavily influenced by the liberal philosophy of Immanuel Kant. The principles of individual freedom and equality are deeply ingrained in American culture and political institutions. The Constitution and Bill of Rights, which form the foundation of American law, are based on the idea of individual rights and freedoms, and the government's role is to protect these rights. Additionally, the United States has a capitalist economic system, which is consistent with Kant's belief in the importance of economic freedom. Overall, the United States is a nation that values individual autonomy and liberty, and these values align with the principles of Kantian liberalism.


Another example that is often cited as using Kant's liberalism as a guiding principle is the European Union (EU). The EU is based on the idea of a supranational union of democratic states, with a strong emphasis on human rights, the rule of law, and the protection of individual freedoms. This is in line with Kant's belief in the universal rights of individuals and the importance of a federation of states governed by laws rather than by individuals or groups. The EU also has a strong commitment to international cooperation and the peaceful resolution of conflicts, which is another key aspect of Kant's liberalism. Additionally, the EU's institutions, such as the European Commission and the European Court of Justice, are designed to ensure the protection of individual rights and the rule of law, further demonstrating the influence of Kant's political philosophy on the EU's structure and values.

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